PodcastBible & Theology

Did the Reformers Believe in the Great Commission?

The leaders of the Protestant Reformation are often regarded as caring only about internal reform, not mission. Is that stereotype accurate?

Did the Reformers Believe in the Great Commission?

Special guest Jonathan Arnold, an Oxford graduate, author, and Assistant Professor of Christian Theology and Church History at Boyce College, joins us to discuss a critical question as we remember the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. Did the Reformers really believe in missions and evangelism, or were they guilty of only focusing inward on the church itself? Did missions go on “hiatus” in the times pan between the death of the apostles and the ministry of William Carey?

Having grown up in Central Louisiana as the son of a Southern Baptist minister, Jonathan Arnold has held numerous academic and ministerial positions before coming to Boyce College. For three years, he served as senior pastor of a Bible Church in Michigan, and prior to that he and his wife led several student-focused ministries on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Most recently, Arnold served as vice president of Student Services and professor of theological studies at Northland International University in Dunbar, Wisconsin.

He has written The Reformed Theology of Benjamin Keach (CBHH, 2013) along with numerous articles, book chapters, and book reviews for various publications. He is a fellow of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies (SBTS) and a visiting fellow of the Centre for Baptist History and Heritage (Oxford).

He and his wife, Lindsay, have four children: Nathaniel, Benjamin, Lukas, and Sadie.

This is part one of a two-part interview. To hear the rest, click here.

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